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Courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey. Image is in the public domain.

This USGS image taken approximately 438 miles above the earth’s surface provides a spectacular view of the Lena Delta in Russia. Image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey.

150 years ago, passenger pigeons were so numerous that they could black out the sky when their flocks passed overhead. The last passenger pigeon, a female named Martha,&nbsp;died in the Cinncinnati Zoo in 1914. All we have left of this species are specimens held in museum collections.

One of the most extensive collections of animal specimens in the world is managed by a tiny unit of the U.S. Geological Survey, called the Biological Survey Unit. A small group of curators maintains a collection of more than one million animals collected over the past 130 years by scientists and ordinary citizens across the U.S.

Now, for reasons that are at best mysterious, the USGS is planning to eliminate the Biological Survey Unit. The BSU has a very small budget, a mere $1.6 million out of the&nbsp;USGS’s budget of $1.1 billion, and an even tinier fraction of the country’s $4.4 trillion budget.

What the heck are they thinking? Shutting down the Biological Survey Unit won’t save enough money in the vast government budget to even be noticed, but the loss of its precious collections will reverberate through the decades. Does someone in the USGS or the Department of the Interior have a grudge against the BSU? Or are they just petty?

The BSU’s collection resides in the&nbsp;Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, one of the great museums of its type in the world. The collection contains some&nbsp;370,000 birds, 300,000 mammals, and 390,000 amphibians and reptiles, many of them dating back to the late 19th century. These specimens represent a unique view back in time, illustrating the natural history of our continent and the animals that have lived on it over the years.

It’s only through collections like this that scientists can understand how human activities have affected our natural world. For example, historical collections of eggs from wild birds allowed scientists to document&nbsp;the thinning of eggshells caused by the pesticide DDT, which was made famous by Rachel Carson’s book&nbsp;Silent Spring.

Just a few weeks ago, the presidents of three of the leading animal science societies in the U.S. wrote&nbsp;a letter to&nbsp;Science&nbsp;magazine&nbsp;pleading for the USGS to continue funding its Biological Survey Unit. So far, the USGS has not responded to them.

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Courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey. Image is in the public domain.

This USGS image taken approximately 438 miles above the earth’s surface provides a spectacular view of the Lena Delta in Russia. Image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey.

150 years ago, passenger pigeons were so numerous that they could black out the sky when their flocks passed overhead. The last passenger pigeon, a female named Martha, died in the Cinncinnati Zoo in 1914. All we have left of this species are specimens held in museum collections.

One of the most extensive collections of animal specimens in the world is managed by a tiny unit of the U.S. Geological Survey, called the Biological Survey Unit. A small group of curators maintains a collection of more than one million animals collected over the past 130 years by scientists and ordinary citizens across the U.S.

Now, for reasons that are at best mysterious, the USGS is planning to eliminate the Biological Survey Unit. The BSU has a very small budget, a mere $1.6 million out of the USGS’s budget of $1.1 billion, and an even tinier fraction of the country’s $4.4 trillion budget.

What the heck are they thinking? Shutting down the Biological Survey Unit won’t save enough money in the vast government budget to even be noticed, but the loss of its precious collections will reverberate through the decades. Does someone in the USGS or the Department of the Interior have a grudge against the BSU? Or are they just petty?

The BSU’s collection resides in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, one of the great museums of its type in the world. The collection contains some 370,000 birds, 300,000 mammals, and 390,000 amphibians and reptiles, many of them dating back to the late 19th century. These specimens represent a unique view back in time, illustrating the natural history of our continent and the animals that have lived on it over the years.

It’s only through collections like this that scientists can understand how human activities have affected our natural world. For example, historical collections of eggs from wild birds allowed scientists to document the thinning of eggshells caused by the pesticide DDT, which was made famous by Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring.

Just a few weeks ago, the presidents of three of the leading animal science societies in the U.S. wrote a letter to Science magazine pleading for the USGS to continue funding its Biological Survey Unit. So far, the USGS has not responded to them.

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